Physics Student is Fulfilling his Career Aspirations

Last year during a symposium at Tulane University, Aziz Muhammad presented on the double beam Pulsed laser deposition. It was during a meeting for the Applied Polymer Technology Extension Consortium, APTEC. Muhammad, '18, had the symposium attendees, all graduate school students or professors, captivated and he's only a sophomore.

During an interview, Muhammad, 19, a precocious undergraduate explained that a double beam Pulsed laser deposition is when two laser beams hit two targets and ablate the material that causes a plume. He is excited to be a part of a research group led by Dr. Abdalla Darwish, Presidential professor and a physics professor at Dillard. He said that Darwish's inventions have changed the way Pulsed laser depositions are done around the world.

Since the age of eight, Muhammad has wanted to pursue a career in physics. As a high school senior in Los Angeles, he had a choice between Southern University and Dillard. He hadn't traveled to the south and was curious about the region and extremely intrigued by New Orleans.

"Dillard came to my hometown at a college expo and it was the friendly vibe they gave off and the helpfulness in addition to being accepted on the spot," he recalled. His GPA and ACT score immediately qualified him.

Muhammad plans to pursue a master's degree after graduation and said he has been fortunate to work on major projects so early in his academic career.  For him, Dr. Darwish's tutelage has provided a pathway to his personal goals and a means to obtain the career he's always wanted.

"It's within my grasp," he said, "all you have to do grab the opportunity. I think at Dillard, those opportunities are much easier to grasp especially with someone like Dr. Darwish."

Dillard University website, New Orleans, LA

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