HT's STEM Research Scholars Investigate Real-World Science

Eleven Huston-Tillotson University students have completed independent research projects during the summer as part of the STEM Research Scholars Program.  The science, technology, engineering, and mathematics scholars in the program conduct hands-on research while they train with faculty mentors at HT and collaborating universities during the fall and spring semesters or over a 10-week long intensive summer internship. The STEM Research Scholars develop the skills they need for STEM careers and graduate study while tackling real-world questions.

Current Summer 2016 STEM Research Scholars and their research areas are as follows: 

  • Aeris Broussard, from Beaumont, TX, graduated from Ozen High School and is interested in a career in occupational therapy.  Broussard studied investigative antibodies and bio printing at the National Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C.
  • K'Ashley Collins, a transfer student who plans to pursue a career in pharmacy, studied investigative antibodies and bio printing at the National Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C.
  • Jay'Dren Compton, a graduate of La Marque High School, plans to join the Air Force with aspirations of attending dental school. Compton developed a microbiome mapping protocol for HT.
  • Carshandra Hollins, graduated from Everman Joe C. Bean High School in Fort Worth, Texas.  She currently serves as Miss HT, plans to complete her bachelor's degree in biology and will continue to earn a doctorate degree with aspirations of entering the teaching profession. She developed a microbiome mapping protocol for HT.
  • Tenaishia Morris attended Ronald Reagan College Preparatory High School in her hometown of Racine, Wisconsin. She is interested in a career as a pediatric physician. She developed a microbiome mapping protocol for HT.
  • Anna Edem Etuk, a chemistry major from Napoli, Italy, plans to work in the pharmaceutical industry to gain experience before enrolling in medical school to become a pediatrician. She studied prostate cancer and disparities at UT Health Science Center, San Antonio.
  • Michael Esuruoso graduated from Nigeria's Greenlands Academy.  He plans to enter medical school to earn a dual Medicine and Public Health (MD/MPH) degree. He studied prostate cancer and disparities at UT Health Science Center, San Antonio.
  • Bob Manuel Johnson graduated from the Port Harcourt's Navy Secondary School. He plans to earn medical and doctoral degrees. He studied prostate cancer and disparities at UT Health Science Center, San Antonio.
  • Anna-Barbara O'James graduated from Nigeria's Christ Ambassadors International College.  She plans to pursue a career in the medical field. She studied prostate cancer and disparities at UT Health Science Center, San Antonio.
  • Tamunobelebra Igoni graduated from Lao Russell Memorial High School in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. He researched air quality monitoring and solar production at HT and Texas State University.
  • Micah Lubin graduated from Eunice High School in Eunice, Louisiana.  She plans to earn a doctorate degree before attending medical school. She investigated protein diversity and genomics at the University of Texas at Austin.

The STEM Research Scholars program directed by HT Associate Professor of Biology Amanda Masino is supported by funding from the National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, Department of the Army, and Department of Education.

As a historically black institution located in Austin, Texas, Huston-Tillotson University's mission is to nurture a legacy of leadership and excellence in education, connecting knowledge, power, passion, and values. The University offers associate and master's degrees in addition to Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in more than 19 areas of study. 

Adapted, Huston-Tillotson University's website

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