What are Chrismons?

The Chrismon tree stands tall in the sanctuary of Cornelia United Methodist Church in Cornelia, Georgia. Photo by Claire DeLand, courtesy of Creative Commons.
The Chrismon tree stands tall in the sanctuary of Cornelia United Methodist Church in Cornelia, Georgia. Photo by Claire DeLand, courtesy of Creative Commons.

Chrismons, meaning "Christ monograms," traditionally are white and gold designs made from Christian symbols that signify Christ. Often displayed on an evergreen tree during the Christmas season, symbols such as stars, crosses, fish, crowns, and the alpha and omega remind us of Christ's identity, his story, and of the holy Trinity.

Chrismons were first developed in 1957 by Frances Spencer and the women of the Ascension Lutheran Church in Danville, VA. 

Many churches today display a Chrismon tree during the Advent and Christmas season decorated with handmade ornaments.

Watch this video to learn more: Chrismon Tree

 

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