Does the UMC accept the baptism of other denominations?

The United Methodist Church recognizes the baptism of other Christian denominations. Image by Aksel Lian from Pixabay.
The United Methodist Church recognizes the baptism of other Christian denominations. Image by Aksel Lian from Pixabay.

Yes, The United Methodist Church recognizes the baptism of other Christian denominations.

So, what does this mean?

For United Methodists, Christian baptism means “water is administered in the name of the triune God by an authorized person.”

We recognize all baptisms in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit (the name of the triune God) that involve water and are done by someone who is authorized by the other denomination to baptize.

We do not re-baptize those who have already received Christian baptism in any form. Our understanding that baptism does not need to be repeated rests on the steadfast faithfulness of God.  Baptism is an act of God and God does it right the first time.

We do not recognize baptisms only in the name of Jesus or Jehovah that do not involve the Trinity. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, though they use the words "Father, Son, and Holy Spirit" when they baptize, mean such different things by this that we both agree that what they offer is not what we consider Christian baptism. We also say no to such practices as "spiritual baptism" that do not involve the use of water at all.

To those who have not yet received Christian baptism, we say, "Come!"  We invite them now to come to the waters so “that having been born through water and the Spirit, you may live as a faithful disciple of Jesus Christ.”

Learn more about baptism:

By Water and The Spirit
This is Your Baptismal Liturgy

Have questions? Ask The UMC or talk with a pastor near you. And check out other recent Q&As.

This content was produced by Ask The UMC, a ministry of United Methodist Communications.