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Topic: Women in Leadership

 

As preachers, leaders, teachers, missionaries, organizers, women have shaped the history of the Methodist Church. In their work with the poor, vulnerable and disenfranchised, church women have initiated important social and political reform.

In the Methodist tradition, women were ordained as ministers as early as the late 19th century, and in 1956 the Methodist Church, a predecessor body of The United Methodist Church, granted women full clergy rights. Women now make up approximately 25% of clergy in The United Methodist Church.

We invite you to explore the inspiring stories of women who have made important contributions to the life of the church both past and present as well as resources to help nurture your own participation and witness as a church leader.

Featured

Daryl Junes-Joe from the Navajo Nation visits Norway with a group from the United Methodist Church advocating for the rights of indigenous peoples.

Navajo Advocate and United Methodist Woman

Daryl Junes-Joe has seen the world far from her home reservation and now serves the church in a new role. “God opened another door. I’ve become a voice.” View

Image portray Susanna Wesley, mother of the founders of Methodism. Courtesy of General Commission on Archives and History.

Susanna Wesley: Mother of Methodism

John and Charles Wesley's mom was a strong woman of faith. “The differences she made have lived on because of the sons that she raised.” View

Maritza Velazquez-Cota offers food and comfort to families in an immigration shelter at the U.S.-Mexico Border.

Maritza’s Ministry: Sharing God’s Love at Mexican Border

In a time when families are facing hard times at the U.S. border, a United Methodist immigrant brings “hugs from God.” View