Skip Navigation
The Rev. Gary Henderson (center) greets elders and chiefs during a visit to Fulawahun village near Bo, Sierra Leone. Henderson heads the United Methodist Church's Imagine No Malaria campaign. File photo by Mike DuBose, United Methodist Communications.

File photo by Mike DuBose, United Methodist Communications

News about terrorism may confound and scare us, but we can be assured there is also news of people of faith living the Gospel and bringing harmony to the world, as Imagine No Malaria provides supplies and education to combat malaria.

A video to say 'thank you' from those who have received so much from the Imagine No Malaria campaign.

United Methodist Communications photo illustration by Cindy Caldwell, images by Mike DuBose.

United Methodist Communications photo illustration by Cindy Caldwell, images by Mike DuBose

News about terrorism may confound and scare us, but we can be assured there is also news of people of faith living the Gospel and bringing harmony to the world.

Previous Next

Defeating evil by doing good: United Methodists offer hope

 

A UMC.org Feature by Joe Iovino

There are plenty of discouraging stories in the world around us about those who seek to separate and do harm. There are also other stories we can tell to remind one another of our connectedness as the human family, and ways we can serve one another. 

Days after a series of terror attacks in Beirut and Paris, November 12 & 13, 2015, The United Methodist Church told an encouraging story of healing and love. 

On Monday, November 16, The United Methodist Church announced that we have raised 90% of our goal—$68 million of a $75 million goal—to combat malaria. The results already seen through the work of the Imagine No Malaria campaign are astounding. By providing bed nets, prevention programs, health care facilities, training for health workers, and more, malaria deaths are nearly half what they had been—and we are moving toward eliminating malaria deaths completely.

Not only is this a story about what we can do together, it also leads us in finding ways overcome evil. There is this Bible passage that teaches this:

If possible, to the best of your ability, live at peace with all people. Don’t try to get revenge for yourselves, my dear friends, but leave room for God’s wrath. It is written, Revenge belongs to me; I will pay it back, says the Lord. Instead, If your enemy is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him a drink. By doing this, you will pile burning coals of fire upon his head. Don’t be defeated by evil, but defeat evil with good. (Romans 12:18-21 CEB – the words in italics are quotes from the Hebrew Scriptures, Deuteronomy 32:35 and Proverbs 25:21-22 respectively)

Many of us felt defeated by evil the weekend after the attacks. We wondered what we could do in the face of this kind of hatred from those who literally want to kill us. We debated national policy, and questioned if anything could have prevented these tragedies. The situation seems unresolvable.

It is to people like us the Apostle Paul wrote, “Don’t be defeated by evil, but defeat evil with good.”

This is the way of the Bible, the way of Jesus. We are not to “fight fire with fire,” but rather to overcome evil with good.

Family celebrates receiving a mosquito net from Imagine No Malaria. Photo by Mike DuBose, United Methodist Communications.

Mosquito nets are one way Imagine No Malaria is combating the disease. These nets are the gift of health to the families who receive them. Photo by Mike DuBose, United Methodist Communications.

Good, like healing those who are sick with malaria and making sure no one else has to suffer. Good, like feeding people who are hungry, clothing those who are naked, and giving a drink to one who is thirsty by serving our local food bank. Good, like visiting those in prison, and welcoming the stranger. Jesus said that when we do these things—or choose not to—for those in the greatest need, we are doing—or not doing—it for him (Matthew 25:31-46).

Maybe this is how we combat evil as followers of the Prince of Peace. Maybe the answer is to refuse to enter into the story of violence, and tell a better story instead.

The better story is the Gospel story. The story of the Kingdom of God on earth as it is in heaven. It is the story lived and taught by Jesus about loving neighbors and enemies. It is the story of feeding 5,000 people and healing those who are broken. It is the story of carrying the pack of an occupying soldier two miles when you’re only required to carry it one. It is the story of meeting the needs of those lowered through a roof, who have enough faith to touch the hem of a robe, or who haven’t the strength to help themselves. It is the story of welcoming the sinner, the lonely, the outcast up a tree, and maybe, just maybe, entertaining angels without even knowing it.

This is the story of life and healing. This is the story with the ability to overcome evil with good.

The Apostle Paul greets the people in Rome with these words, “Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Romans 1:7 CEB)—a greeting he was fond of using in many of his letters. As followers of Christ, may this be our greeting to one another and our invitation to the whole world in word and deed.

“Don’t be defeated by evil, but defeat evil with good” (Rom 12:21). This is the way of the Bible, of Jesus.TWEET THISTWEET THIS

This story was first posted November 18, 2015.

*Joe Iovino works for UMC.org at United Methodist Communications. Contact him by email or at 615-312-3733.

 
{disqus_comment_policy}