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Special Coverage: Hurricane Katrina

Haylie Wollitz (right) from First United Methodist Church in Santa Monica, Calif., helps repair flood damage from Hurricane Katrina at the home of Betty Johnson in New Orleans. Photo by Mike DuBose, UMNS.

Photo by Mike DuBose, UMNS

Haylie Wollitz (right) from First United Methodist Church in Santa Monica, Calif., helps repair flood damage from Hurricane Katrina at the home of Betty Johnson in New Orleans. The Epworth Project, which hosts volunteers from across the country, has a full slate of recovery projects underway 10 years after Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast.

When the waters finally receded from Hurricane Katrina, life looked hopeless. An ugly gray sludge coated everything, mold “bloomed” everywhere. The smell was unbearable and unforgettable.

In the decade following Aug. 29, 2005, United Methodist News Service made many visits to places wrecked by Katrina. Progress has been made and in 2015, after all the darkness, silver linings have begun to emerge. Churches have been rebuilt and ministries are stronger than before.

Hundreds of thousands of United Methodists took part in that recovery with their hearts, hands and money. Here are their stories of resurrection.