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Interior of Lovely Lane United Methodist Church as seen in January of 2014. Photo by Subodh Atal, shared via Facebook.

Lovely Lane:  A Methodist Birthplace

Dedicated on Nov. 6, 1887, this church became one of our most important buildings. “Your feet are truly on holy ground. Your eyes look upward and you see amazing things.” View

A three-handled love feast cup is on display at the United Methodist General Commission on Archives and History in New Jersey.

Methodist History: The What and Why of Love Feasts

John Wesley was influenced by the Moravians in adopting this Christian fellowship meal as a way of building community in the early days of Methodism. View

Edna Rajan stacks flood buckets from the United Methodist Committee on Relief at a warehouse in Lafayette, Louisiana in 2016.

Offer Support After Storms: Create Cleaning Buckets

Looking for a way to show support to storm survivors? Video shows easy steps to fill a bucket with the most helpful supplies for clean up after a disaster. View

Image of factory workers. Courtesy of U.S. Library of Congress.

Methodist History: 1908 Social Creed for Workers

Since the time of John Wesley, the Methodist church has taken a strong stance for the rights of workers. View

The base of a statue of George Washington in Union Square Park, New York City, became a place where expressions of love were shared in chalk in the days following 9/11. Photo courtesy Jennifer Rodia, United Methodist Communications.

Responding to hate: 9/11 and the power of love

Each year, the date 9/11 brings back strong feelings. United Methodists in New York remember how acts of love were a powerful response to the terrorist attacks of 2001. Read More

The sign at Pennington United Methodist Church in Nashville, Tenn., proclaims a message of hope. File photo by Raymond Landry.

The United Methodist Church: More than a name

Learn how our church's name was chosen. “If you leave the name ‘United’ off you’re leaving off both a significant piece and powerful part of who we are.” Read More

Lay pastor Raphaël Aboua helps serve Holy Communion at Ebenezer Beago United Methodist Church. Photo by Isaac Broune, UMNS

Methodist History: Why Isn’t Communion Every Sunday?

You may know that in The United Methodist Church communion is offered to all, but here's why schedules for the sacrament vary among churches. View

Photo of Methodist circuit rider Peter Cartwright. Image in the public domain.

Peter Cartwright: Memorable Methodist Circuit Rider

This colorful, early Methodist challenged Abraham Lincoln for political office and won 8-10,000 souls for Christ. View

Exterior view of Barratt's Chapel, a United Methodist Heritage Landmark in Delaware.

Barratt’s Chapel: Independence Hall of American Methodism

Get a drone's eye view of the site where ‘the first truly American-born denomination’ came together. View

Methodists Ann and Anna Jarvis are credited with creating Mother's Day in the U.S. Courtesy: Historic St. George's UMC.

Mothers of U.S. Mother’s Day were West Virginia Methodists

Ann Jarvis had the idea and her daughter Anna led a campaign in the early 1900s to have Mother's Day recognized as a national holiday. Read More

The Rev. Andrea Beyer (left) and the Rev. Cathryn Love stand near a church sign in Beaver Crossing, Nebraska. Image courtesy of Great Plains Conference/creative commons.

Do you know why we are called United Methodists?

The United Methodist Church was born in April. Learn more about how our denomination got its name and why it matters how you say it. Read More

Image portray Susanna Wesley, mother of the founders of Methodism. Courtesy of General Commission on Archives and History.

Susanna Wesley: Mother of Methodism

John and Charles Wesley's mom was a strong woman of faith. “The differences she made have lived on because of the sons that she raised.” View

Methodist reformer Frances Willard is seen in portrait. Courtesy of United Methodist General Commission on Archives and History.

Methodist History: Early Voice for Women’s Rights

Learn more about the 19th century reformer who fought for voting rights and full representation in the Methodist Church. View

Pilgrims visit the tomb of John Wesley and learn a valuable lesson for ministry from his epitaph. Photo by Kathleen Barry, United Methodist Communications.

What we can learn from the words on John Wesley’s tomb

The Methodist movement's founder was remembered as a great evangelist and his epitaph has lessons for every Christian. Wesley died March 2, 1791. Read More

Artist's drawing shows sinners seeking repentance at an early Methodist camp meeting. Image in the public domain.

Methodist History: The Mourner’s Bench

Historians say a piece of plain, rustic furniture in early Methodist churches was actually a sacred place of transformation. View

Ushers prepare for the offertory during a Sunday morning service at Metropolitan Memorial United Methodist Church in Washington D.C. Video image by United Methodist Communications.

Methodist History: Church of Presidents

A United Methodist landmark in Washington, D.C. was built with donations from leaders like Lincoln along with church members across the U.S. View

Several U.S. presidents had ties to   what is now The United Methodist Church.  Photo illustration by Kathleen Barry.

Many U.S. presidents have Methodist ties

Leaders from Lincoln to FDR to Obama turned to Wesley's followers for spiritual and social aid. Read More

The Rev. James Lawson (left) joins Martin Luther King and Ralph Jackson at a March 1968 press conference. Photo used with permission from the SCLC of California.

James Lawson: Reflections on Life, Nonviolence, Civil Rights, MLK

The United Methodist pastor's parents told him “there’s a better way” than violence to resolve conflict. Those words would shape James Lawson’s life, leadership and ministry. View

The Rev. Gilbert Caldwell poses with his wife Grace, and sons Dale and Paul in front of Bryantville United Methodist Church.

Gilbert Caldwell: Voice for Justice and Human Rights

The retired United Methodist pastor reflects on how his relationship with MLK and involvement in the civil rights movement shaped his life and ministry. View

Gospel music artist Guy Penrod portrays a circuit rider. Photo courtesy of Gaither Music.

Hardships, faith of Methodist circuit riders inspire new music

A new video project uses excerpts of letters and journals from the circuit riders who first brought Methodism to rural America. Read More

The Rev. Ralph Abernathy and his family march with the Rev. and Mrs. Martin Luther King on march from Selma to Montgomery in 1965. Courtesy: Abernathy Family/Wikimedia Commons.

Eyewitness to Selma: Faith Leaders’ Stand for Civil Rights

“Many people cannot understand the depth of patriotism of Martin King and other civil rights heroes and heroines. View

Westminster's Methodist Central Hall hosts historic events that celebrate the life and ministry of John Wesley, founder of The United Methodist Church. Photos by Joe Iovino, United Methodist Communications.

Serving the world from the heart of London: Methodist Central Hall

In January 1946, the first United Nations General Assembly met in a building constructed to celebrate the life and ministry of John Wesley. Read More

Image of Methodist Bishop Gilbert Haven. Courtesy: Archives and History.

Methodist History: Bishop Fought Slavery

Gilbert Haven lived in the 19th-century but was progressive in his stances to end slavery, allow interracial marriage, and grant ordination of women. View

Comic books feature the adventures of Methodism's founding fathers, John Wesley and Francis Asbury. The books were published by Ron Kerr Associates, 1976. Image from video by United Methodist Communications.

Comic Books Animate United Methodist History

John Wesley and Francis Asbury join the ranks of action heroes like Batman and The Hulk in comic books designed to educate and entertain. View

Image of the Rev. Charles Albert Tindley. Courtesy of Tindley Temple United Methodist Church, Philadelphia, PA.

Tindley Temple: A Highlight of Methodist History

Learn about a church named for a Methodist preacher who drew huge crowds in the '20s and was a founding father of Gospel music. View

Slanted communion cups allowed Victorian era Methodists to avoid the appearance of drinking alcohol. Video image by United Methodist Communications.

Methodist History: Communion Cups

Have you seen an unusual communion cup set at your church? Learn secrets behind the slanted glassware that many Victorian era Methodists used. View

Caring for the spiritual well-being of her family was very important to Susanna Wesley. Photo by Kathleen Barry, United Methodist Communications.

Courage and conviction: A woman’s leadership through a difficult time

When Susanna Wesley found the spiritual depth of her church lacking, she led her own devotions. When people objected, she stood firm. Read More

Suffragettes march with flags in Washington, D.C., in an archival image dated 1910 to 1920. Six Methodist women advocated for women’s voting rights as part of their Christian calling. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

6 Methodist women who fought for the vote

Expanding the franchise to all adult citizens took great risk and great faith. Fortunately, these Wesleyans were on the case. Read More

The window at Lincoln College in Oxford features a depiction of the story of Jonah (2nd from the right) that influenced John Wesley. Photo by Kathleen Barry, United Methodist Communications.

Discovering God’s will: John Wesley’s difficult decision

John Wesley set sail for America on October 21, 1735, after a discernment process that included a Bible story and a stained glass window. Read More

An image of the Wesleys'

Why the Wesleys, and others, came to be called Methodists

Early members of the movement had nicknames like Holy Club, Bible Moths, Sacramentarians, and Enthusiasts. Learn why one name stuck. More

A statue of John Wesley greets visitors to The New Room in Bristol, England. Photo by Joe Iovino, United Methodist Communications.

The method of Methodism expands: Societies and the New Room

Series continues a look at what happened after the Wesleys left Oxford. See how the small group model shaped the Methodist movement. Part 2 of 3. Read More

Names of those killed are etched onto the 9/11 Memorial in New York City. Photo by Fran Coode Walsh, United Methodist Communications.

15 years later: United Methodists remember 9/11

In an exclusive series, church leaders and members share personal accounts of what happened that dark day and how it impacted their lives and their congregations. More

A photo taken following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in New York shows a memorial on the street. Photo courtesy of Jennifer Rodia, United Methodist Communications.

United Methodists Recall 9/11 in New York

15 years later, New Yorkers remember how their home churches stepped up to feed and care for neighbors following the 2001 terrorist attacks. View

The Rev. James Lawson talks about Black Lives Matter and the civil rights movement during a break from teaching at the Children Defense Fund’s Proctor Institute in Clinton, Tenn. UMNS photo by Mike DuBose

Lawson: Black Lives Matter shows need for change

The Rev. James Lawson says the movement is an extension of the social awakening that started with the civil rights movement. Read More

The Rev. James Lawson: Civil Rights and Black Lives Matter

United Methodist leader reflects on the long fight for justice. “You have to allow history to move at its own pace.” View

Wesley pilgrims learn a great deal about John Wesley, but the pilgrimage is ultimately about their relationship with Jesus Christ. Photo by Kathleen Barry, United Methodist Communications.

Wesley pilgrims visit the past to shape the future

Touring historic sites in England encourages United Methodists to continue the early Methodist ministry of growing together as disciples of Jesus Christ. Read More

Image of Charles Wesley. Courtesy of United Methodist Commission on Archives and History.

Charles Wesley’s Gift of Music

John's younger brother made his own contribution as “the poet laureate and great writer of Methodism.” View

Statue of Methodist Bishop Francis Asbury stands on grounds of Drew University in New Jersey. Photo by Kathleen Barry, United Methodist Communications.

Methodism’s American Saint: Bishop Francis Asbury

He died March 31, 1816 and Asbury's efforts helped Methodism become the largest Protestant church body in America just 75 years after his death. View

A colonial-era circuit-riding evangelist was part a special service on June 26 at Boehm’s Chapel, a United Methodist heritage landmark near Lancaster, Pennsylvania. A trio of Mennonite bishops brought a proclamation reversing the 1775 ex-communication of Martin Boehm, a Mennonite who became a founder of the present-day United Methodist Church. Photo by John Coleman, Eastern Pennsylvania Conference

Mennonites reconnect with UMC founder

At Boehm’s Chapel near Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Mennonites restore credentials of a founder of the present-day United Methodist Church. Read More

Actor portrays the Rev. Simon Blessing, an itinerant Methodist minister from the 1700s. Video image by Chris Foster.

Methodist history comes to life at St. George’s

Philadelphia church offers an experience in time travel for curious United Methodists. And history lessons that ring true today. View

Scene at John Wesley's deathbed is depicted in historic image. Courtesy of United Methodist General Commission on Archives and History.

Methodist leaders Wesley, Asbury died in March

John Wesley died in 1791 and the founding bishop of Methodism in America died 25 years later. Historians salute both this month. More

Historic image shows Titanic at sea.  Courtesy Phil Gowan.

Ties to the Titanic: Methodists aboard the famous ship

Among the many intriguing stories of survivors, historian Phil Gowan says a Methodist man married a woman he met on a lifeboat. View

The Rev. Gil Caldwell walks with MLK at a rally in Boston in 1958. Courtesy: the Rev. Gil Caldwell.

The Rev. Gil Caldwell: Sharing MLK’s Dream

'One can never be at rest when one knew Martin King.' Retired pastor stood with civil rights leader then, and continues fight for justice today. View

Woman holds candle. Photo by Courtney Carmody, courtesy of Flickr.

United Methodist Prayer for the Migrant Crisis

'Grant us the wisdom to act in a way that turns history upside down.' Committee on Relief asks for solidarity with those fleeing conflict. More

The Great Auditorium stands in the center of Ocean Grove, New Jersey. Photo by Fran Coode Walsh.

Global destinations that matter to United Methodists

Learn about seven sites with a strong connection to the past, present and future of The United Methodist Church. More

The Rev. James Lawson speaks about nonviolence at First Baptist Church in Montgomery, Ala., the site of a 1961 confrontation between Freedom Riders and an angry mob. 2009 file photo by Kathy L. Gilbert,  United Methodist News Service.

The Rev. James Lawson: Sharing MLK’s Dream

“Love and truth and compassion still are the only ways.” The Rev. James Lawson recalls what he learned from MLK. View

Rev. Dr. Joseph E. Lowery's Ninety Years Birthday Celebration at the Atlanta Symphony Hall, October 9, 2011 included a birthday song by Stevie Wonder.  Next to Rev. Lowery is his wife of 60 years, Evelyn Lowery. Photo by Kathleen Barry, United Methodist Communications.

The Rev. Joseph Lowery: Sharing MLK’s Dream

“The fear of death...never affected his commitment.” The Rev. Joseph Lowery describes his time with Martin Luther King Jr. View

1944 General Conference reporters (who also autographed the photo). Ralph W. Stoody, founding chief executive of Methodist Information, is in the far back corner. Photo courtesy of  United Methodist Communications, edited by UMC.org.

Progressing technology strengthens innovative agency

From the manual typewriters of the 1940s to today's sleek hand-held devices, United Methodist Communications has a track record of embracing new technologies. Read More

Victor Cyrus-Franklin serves as an assistant pastor at Holman United Methodist Church in Los Angeles. Photo provided by Victor Cyrus-Franklin.

Victor Cyrus-Franklin: Sharing MLK’s Dream

"We can learn from what happened then to help us learn what...to do now." Young pastor recalls the teachings of Martin Luther King Jr. View

The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial in Washington was dedicated by President Obama on Oct. 16, 2011. Photo by Maile Bradfield, United Methodist Communications.

United Methodists share MLK’s dream

United Methodists who knew the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. describe how he changed their lives. View

Retired United Methodist Bishop Melvin G. Talbert .A UMNS file photo by John C. Goodwin.

Bishop Melvin Talbert: Sharing MLK’s Dream

“I was privileged to be in the same jail cell with him for three days and three nights.” Bishop Melvin Talbert recalls the influence of Martin Luther King Jr. View

Wendy and Jake Jacobs were presented Saturday with a plaque dedicating Amis House, as a historic site of the United Methodist Church. The plaque was presented by Bishop Mary Virginia Taylor, left. Photo by Jeff Bobo, courtesy Times News Online.

Bishops return to Amis House 225 years after Asbury’s visit

Amis House in Kingsport, Tenn., is considered the site where Bishop Francis Asbury launched his westward outreach in 1790. The settlement has been deemed an official church historical location. Read More

Women immigrants who traveled alone were often at risk when they arrived at Ellis Island in the late 19th century. Public domain image.

Methodist History: Welcoming Women Immigrants

Alma Mathews made her mission field Ellis Island. She and others offered a safety net for women traveling alone. View

Let Us Break Bread Together on Our Knees

One of the most recognizable Communion hymns was formed in the West African Gullah/Geechee slave culture that developed in the coastal areas of South-Eastern colonial America. Read More

Bishop James Thomas: Sharing MLK’s Dream

“Martin was about much more than race.” Bishop James Thomas reflects on the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. View

Bishop Felton May at the 2008 United Methodist General Conference in Fort Worth, Texas. May is interim chief executive of the United Methodist Board of Global Ministries. A UMNS photo by Mike DuBose. Photo #GC0088. April 24, 2008. Photo by Mike DuBose, United Methodist Communications.

Bishop Felton May: Sharing MLK’s Dream

“Thanks be to God for you having the courage to utilize the gifts that God gave you.” Bishop Felton May shares a message to Martin Luther King Jr. View

Del Shields hosted groundbreaking United Methodist radio talk show, ‘Night Call.’ Photo courtesy of the General Board of Archives and History.

‘Night Call’ spurred conversations on race in 1960s

Groundbreaking United Methodist-produced radio show featured Stokely Carmichael, Shirley Chisholm, Andrew Young and more. Hear original audio. Read More

Photographer John C. Goodwin holds a copy of the book written by his father.

UMTV: Church Photos of a Lifetime

The 1963 March on Washington inspired John Goodwin to use his lens to bring human struggles into focus View

Oct. 2006 image shows graffiti reading

German bishop writes of fall and call of Berlin Wall

Rosemarie Wenner says dreams came true in November 1989, but 'the unification of my nation is also a call. There are too many walls in our world.' Read More

UMTV: Museum of Methodism

The United Methodist Church's rich history comes to life in a fascinating collection of treasures. View

Francis Asbury's Bible is part of the collection at Historic St. George's UMC in Philadelphia. Photo by Fran Coode Walsh.

Cathedral Church of American Methodism

'I think people, no matter what side of any issue you’re on, love the denomination, love our history. And this is where you can connect to it.' View

250-year-old John Street United Methodist is home to the first Methodist congregation in the U.S.  Image by Beyond My Ken, WikiMedia Commons.

Historic Church’s Connection to 9/11

Encore video revisits church near Ground Zero to see how members marked the year after terrorist attacks tested their faith. View

Soldiers wade through surf and Nazi gunfire to secure a beachhead during the Allied Invasion, June 6, 1944. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army.

Churches mark D-Day anniversary with bell ringing

As American soldiers set sail for Normandy on June 6, 1944, church bells rang nationwide. An Ashland, Ky., church will honor the day with the same bells. Read More