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Sierra Leone Video Diary: Distribution Friday

Street performers get the word out on market day, that The United Methodist Church is going door to door to educate people on the use of life-saving bed nets. The nets are a component of an education, medical, and prevention program by The United Methodist Church called Imagine No Malaria.

Learn more at http://www.umc.org/sierra-leone-nets.

Script:

It’s market day in Gerihun, Sierra Leone.

(malaria skit being played out in the market)

It’s a prime place to showcase goods and to share information.

This acting troop is promoting the nationwide distribution of insecticide treated bed nets.

Health worker: “So, what is your name?”

Just a short distance down the road, villagers bring in their vouchers for free nets.

Health worker: “How many rooms do you get?”

Mohammed is here to monitor and evaluate the systems of checks and balances that have been put in place to make sure every household gets enough coverage to protect them from mosquito bites.

(baby crying)

One card, or voucher equals one net. They receive their vouchers through house to house visits from trained healthcare workers and volunteers.

(tearing plastic)

Another important safeguard is the opening of the plastic nets packaging on site, which discourages the nets from being sold. The United Methodist Church’s Imagine No Malaria program is responsible for the distribution in the Bo District.

(Phileas speaks to man)

That means everything from supplying the nets, training volunteers to monitor proper distribution and use.

“These are new?” “Yes, Sir.”

Frank Kposowa Is a member of the Sierra Leone Parliament. He happened by this distribution point in Benduma and was impressed with the operation.

Frank Kposowa, Member of Sierra Leone Parliament: “This is going to boost the people. It gives the whole thing credibility and I’m happy. I’m happy with that.” 

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