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The first United Methodist mobile clinic in the Philippines offered services for the first time on Feb. 20 at Greene Academy, a United Methodist high school in the San Vicinte barangay in the town of Makilala. More than 100 people received medical and dental care from two doctors and four dentists at the clinic. Photo courtesy of Bishop Rodolfo Juan.

Photo courtesy of Bishop Rodolfo Juan

The first United Methodist mobile clinic in the Philippines offered services for the first time on Feb. 20 at Greene Academy, a United Methodist high school in the San Vicinte barangay in the town of Makilala. More than 100 people received medical and dental care from two doctors and four dentists at the clinic.

A new mobile bus clinic was donated to help United Methodists reach “more patients in far-flung areas,” said Bishop Rodolfo Juan, pictured third from left. The mobile bus clinic was donated by Riza Angara-Moises of the Genesis Transport Service, Inc., through Homer Garong, a United Methodist lawyer. Photo courtesy of Bishop Rodolfo Juan.

Photo courtesy of Bishop Rodolfo Juan

A new mobile bus clinic was donated to help United Methodists reach “more patients in far-flung areas,” said Bishop Rodolfo Juan, pictured third from left. The mobile bus clinic was donated by Riza Angara-Moises of the Genesis Transport Service, Inc., through Homer Garong, a United Methodist lawyer.

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Mobile clinic provides medical, dental care

 

By Gladys Mangiduyos
March 10, 2017 | MAKILALA, Philippines (UMNS)

A new mobile bus clinic was donated to help United Methodists reach “more patients in far-flung areas,” Bishop Rodolfo Juan said.

The first United Methodist mobile clinic in the Philippines offered services for the first time on Feb. 20 at Greene Academy, a United Methodist high school in the San Vicente barangay in the town of Makilala.

More than 100 people received medical and dental care from two doctors and four dentists at the clinic.

“This is the first time that we utilized this mobile bus clinic here in Mindanao. We offered medical, optical and dental services,” Juan said.

A new mobile bus clinic was donated to help United Methodists reach “more patients in far-flung areas,” said Bishop Rodolfo Juan, pictured third from left. The mobile bus clinic was donated by Riza Angara-Moises of the Genesis Transport Service, Inc., through Homer Garong, a United Methodist lawyer.  Photo courtesy of Bishop Rodolfo Juan.

A new mobile bus clinic was donated to help United Methodists reach “more patients in far-flung areas,” said Bishop Rodolfo Juan, pictured third from left. Photo courtesy of Bishop Rodolfo Juan.    

The mobile bus clinic was donated by Riza Angara-Moises of the Genesis Transport Service, Inc., through Homer Garong, a United Methodist lawyer. 

The bishop said that the bus clinic intends to offer medical, optical, dental, evangelistic and legal-livelihood services, or MODEL services, to non-United Methodists as well as church members.

“We can grab the opportunity to reach them out and to evangelize them,” he said.

The bishop said that the doctors were from The United Methodist Church and the local government unit.

“For medicines, we received donations from the municipal hall, and some financial support from United Methodist leaders,” he said, adding that the church plans to organize United Methodist doctors as a backup MODEL team.

The Rev. Edwin Exiomo, district superintendent of Mindanao Central East district, said the clinic will return to the barangays of Makilala in April, and another is planned for Cotabato in May.

A patient receives medical treatment in the United Methodist mobile clinic. Photo courtesy of Bishop Rodolfo Juan.

A patient receives medical treatment in the United Methodist mobile clinic. Photo courtesy of Bishop Rodolfo Juan.    

“It has brought good impact to the community of barangay San Vicente. This is the very first time the barangay had its kind of mobile clinic,” Exiomo said.

Edgar Jamon, the vice president of the United Methodist Young Adult Fellowship, said young adult volunteers and pastors helped with the medical mission, which started with prayer and worship.

“The community is grateful. It was their first time to have medical mission; the folks are actually looking forward for another medical mission,” he said. “I saw in their faces how grateful they are after being given medical and dental services.”

Jamon said people who live in the community mostly farm and work in rubber processing companies or on banana plantations. 

“Seeking medical and dental help would be costly for them.”

Jamon said more resources are needed, both doctors and medicines. He said that during the medical mission they ran out of supplies and medicines.

“It is so rewarding to inspire and help people,” Jarmon said.

Mangiduyos is a United Methodist News Service correspondent based in the Philippines. News media contact: Vicki Brown, Nashville, Tenn., (615) 742-5470 or newsdesk@umcom.org. To get more United Methodist news, subscribe to the free Daily or Weekly Digests.